Antarctica's Emperor penguins could go extinct by 2100 – Al Mayadeen English


A new study reveals that only US$23 million annually would be required to put ten crucial initiatives into action that would lessen threats to Antarctica’s biodiversity.
New research has indicated that more has to be done to conserve the Antarctic ecosystems because, if no change is made, up to 97% of the land-based Antarctic species may see their numbers collapse by the year 2100.
The study, which was just released, also revealed that only US$23 million annually would be required to put ten crucial initiatives into action that would lessen threats to Antarctica’s biodiversity.
Up to 84% of the terrestrial bird, animal, and plant groups would gain from this very tiny sum.
Numerous microorganisms, tough invertebrates, two flowering plants, hardy moss and lichens, two flowering plants, and hundreds of thousands of nesting seabirds, including the Emperor and Adélie penguins, make up the species.
Antarctica’s ice-free regions are anticipated to grow as global warming becomes worse, drastically altering the wildlife environment. Additionally, it is projected that the vegetation and animals of Antarctica would suffer as extreme weather events like heatwaves increase in frequency.
29 specialists in Antarctic biodiversity, conservation, logistics, tourism, and policy were consulted for our study. The specialists predicted how the animals of Antarctica would react to potential threats.
If present conservation efforts continue on their current course, the populations of 97% of Antarctic terrestrial species and breeding seabirds might potentially drop between now and 2100.
37% of the species populations would, at best, decline. By 2100, 65% of the plants and animals on the continent are expected to disappear.
The Emperor penguin is the most endangered species in Antarctica because it breeds on ice. The emperor penguin is the only species in our analysis that, in the worst-case scenario, face extinction by 2100.
In short, scientists warn that other Antarctic specialties like the nematode worm Scottnema lindsayae are also predicted to suffer adverse effects from climate change. The species is threatened as soil moisture rises due to warming and ice melt since it thrives in extremely dry soils.
Meanwhile, a combination of local, national, and international conservation initiatives are required since Antarctica is under increasing strain from both climate change and human activity. It is an unbelievable bargain to spend only US$23 million a year to protect Antarctica’s wildlife and ecosystems, scientists argue.
Read more: Polar bears in sharp decline in Canada’s Western Hudson Bay
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