Two artists nature discuss their craft | | stardem.com – The Star Democrat


Mary Veiga creates impressionistic, sun-drenched canvases and displays them at the Waterfowl Festival. Like a Rothko, they invite you to fall in, but in a sunnier way.
The tent is full of great artists and Paul Rhymer is a rare one who is interested in the work of other artists around him. Rhymer spends time observing animals in order to sculpt them from bronze.
Mary Veiga creates impressionistic, sun-drenched canvases and displays them at the Waterfowl Festival. Like a Rothko, they invite you to fall in, but in a sunnier way.
The tent is full of great artists and Paul Rhymer is a rare one who is interested in the work of other artists around him. Rhymer spends time observing animals in order to sculpt them from bronze.
EASTON — All the fabulous art was ready to be enjoyed at the Waterfowl Festival this weekend. Since 1970, the festival has been a great opportunity for artists and patrons to connect. There are all kinds of nature-based art from duck carvers to rooster bronze casters to plein air painters absorbing a moment.
Mary Veiga paints canvases you could float into. She has a home in Tilghman and draws inspiration for her impressionistic landscapes from the sunsets there.
“I love painting the Eastern Shore. My main subject matter is the Eastern Shore and the low lands and I love hitting the big atmospheric skies that you see across the Chesapeake Bay. When I paint it can go back and forth and back and forth until I capture the mood that I want. And filling the space with this atmosphere of peace and tranquility and beauty and love. I like the possibilities of what could be,” said Veiga.
“I am very grateful to do what I love,” she said. “I love working with Trippe Gallery, but this is great too. I participate in a lot of competitions including Plein Air Easton. Plein Air is really different than working in a studio. It is your impression and you are using all of your senses. In the studio I use several photos, never just one. I used to do murals and I really love to create something that you can walk into and feel and makes you feel uplifted, hopeful, serene.”
The next artist is Paul Rhymer, who sculpts meticulous animal studies in bronze. He has been an artist at the festival a total of 18 times.
“I am a wildlife sculptor from Point of Rocks, Maryland. It is the lost wax casting technique. So I sculpt in clay and then go through a molding and casting process to reproduce them in bronze. I enjoy what I do so I don’t need to be patient,” said Rhymer.
He went to art school at Montgomery Community College and then had a 25-year career as a model maker and taxidermy worker at the Smithsonian. He has a home in Dorchester County.
“It is a really easy show for me to do. I get to visit old collectors, artist friends and I can eat as much crab as I want. Selling art is not as important as if I am going to Colorado to do an art show. Since I am on home ground, I have the luxury to enjoy myself a little more. Since there is such a rich tradition of both waterfowl art and the art tradition here in Easton, it is a pretty fun weekend,” he said.
He spoke about his process.
“I normally get inspired by an idea whether it was something I saw duck hunting or fishing or bird watching and then I work that idea up in to what would make an interesting sculpture. In the case of that turkey behind you, I shot a turkey. I mounted it in a position that I wanted and I used that as my reference.”
His price range is $350 to $25,000. He does editions up to 25. He sells his work in Jackson Hole and Santa Fe. He has raptors and rabbits and roosters wrought as if they are still alive.
“Yes it is a serious investment for someone. If you are doing it right, you are getting better all the time. So by the time you have done 25 you are ready to move on to something new. What is the point of doing what you have always done? You are in a rut. When I am in a rut, I go duck hunting or trout fishing,” said Rhymer.
Both artists are replenished by nature and being very perceptive while out there.
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