Article 10 certificate for CITES-protected live birds: guidance for completing form FED1012 – GOV.UK


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Updated 8 April 2022

© Crown copyright 2022
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This publication is available at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/endangered-species-application-for-commercial-use/article-10-certificate-for-cites-protected-live-birds-guidance-for-completing-form-fed1012
CITES is the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora. It aims to protect endangered animals and plants.
This guidance will help you apply for an Article 10 certificate for a live bird that is protected by CITES. The certificate allows you to use the bird for commercial purposes.
When you fill out the form, include all the information we ask for in this guidance. We will contact you if we need extra information, but this may slow down your application.
You need an Article 10 certificate if both of the following apply:
Examples of commercial gain include:
Do not arrange to sell or use your bird commercially until you receive your Article 10 certificate.
You do not need to apply for an Article 10 certificate if:
If you give the bird as a gift, you should confirm the gift in a signed and dated letter that also includes your address. In the letter, you should tell the new owner:
To check if your bird is listed in CITES EU/GB Annex A, you need the full, scientific name of your bird’s species, which will be in Latin. If you’re unsure you can:
We cannot accept common names and we cannot identify species.
Once you know your bird’s scientific name, search for it on Species Plus. The EU/GB Annex for your bird is listed further down the page in the section ‘EU Wildlife Trade Regulations’. You can also get to this section via the tab, ‘EU Listing’.
The EU Annex is the same as the GB Annex. So, EU Annex A is the same as GB Annex A.
If your bird is listed as EU/GB Annex A, you must apply for an Article 10 certificate.
You can check the common English name of your bird via the ‘Names’ tab. You need this information for the section, ‘Common name of species’ (box 16). If several common names are listed, use the first.
You must pay fees to cover the cost of your application. The fees are:
If an additional bird doesn’t have the same parents, you pay the full fee (£31) for that bird.
We will process your application when we receive your payment. You can pay with your credit or debit card by phoning 01633 631 800, or send a cheque or postal order to:
UK CITES Management Authority
Centre for International Trade – Bristol
Horizon House
Deanery Road
Bristol
BS1 5AH

You will need to tell us the correct fee. If you’re unsure, phone 0117 372 3700 or email wildlife.licensing@apha.gov.uk
When you pay, ask for a payment reference number and add it to your application form. We can also email this to you.
Download the application form and complete it electronically if you can. Electronic forms are easier to read and quicker to process.
If you cannot download a form, we can send you a paper copy. You can request this by phone 0117 372 3700 or email wildlife.licensing@apha.gov.uk
Write ‘N/A’ (which means ‘not applicable’) in any box you are not using. If you do not, we may assume the information is missing and contact you.
Firstly, tick the box that reads ‘Certificate for commercial activities’. It’s in the top right-hand corner of the form.
Then fill in each box of the form as described below.
Write your name and contact details – not those of an agent.
Write (BREEDER) in brackets after your name if you are the breeder of the birds. If you have a breeder ID number from a previous application add this as well.
If you have appointed an agent to apply on your behalf:
If you are including a letter that authorises an agent, let us know in box 20 (‘Remarks’).
Fill in this box if your bird has been taken from the wild (source W). If not, write ‘N/A’.
This box is pre-printed with the UK CITES address.
If you run out of space, you can send additional information by:
Start your description with LIV, which means ‘Live’.
You must include each bird’s:
If you do not know the hatch date, you must tell us why in box 20 (‘Remarks’), or in a covering email or letter.
For each bird’s male and female parent you must provide both the:
If you have an EU Article 10 certificate, you must include a copy with your application.
If you do not know any of this information, write ‘Unknown’ and tell us why.
Try to create a unique closed ring number, rather than a short sequence of numbers and letters. For example, a sequential number, followed by a postcode or the breeder’s initials and phone number.
If you are a breeder and you do not own the parent birds, or you have purchased or been gifted semen for artificial insemination, then you need to provide:
If the parent birds have produced an unusually large clutch size and you are applying for Article 10 certificates for the offspring, tell us about the breeding methods used.
LIV
One live male barn owl
Closed ring number: OWL01TEL01231456035
Hatch date: 03/04/2021
Parent female A10 number: XXXXXX/01, closed ring number WEL0072257
LIV
One live peregrine falcon (sex unknown)
Microchip number: 915000258741254
Hatch date: 03/2021
Parent female A10 no: XXXXXX/01, closed ring no WEL0072257
Parent male A10 no: XXXXXX/01, microchip number: 012345678912345
Example of a description of a hybrid bird
LIV
One live female hybrid falcon (Falco rusticolus X Falco cherrug)
Closed ring number 123044-01 GB
Hatch date: 05/05/2019
Parent female A10 no: XXXXXX/01, closed ring no WEL0072257
Parent male A10 no: XXXXXX/01, microchip number: 012345678912345
Write ‘N/A’ in this box.
You must use a separate application form for each bird, so the quantity is always 1.
You need to tell us which CITES Appendix your bird is listed in. To do this:
For hybrid birds, you need to check the individual species. This is because Species Plus does not include the names of hybrid birds – only individual species. If the individual species have different CITES Appendix numbers, tell us the highest.
You need to confirm that your bird is in GB Annex A. The EU Annex is the same as the GB Annex. So, EU Annex A is the same as GB Annex A.
If your bird is not in GB/EU Annex A, you do not need an Article 10 certificate.
To do this:
This is where you tell us about your bird’s origins.
There are 10 sources listed on the back of the form – you choose 1. We have listed here the most common sources.
If you are unsure which code to use, email wildlife.licensing@apha.gov.uk or phone 0117 372 3700.
If you are including additional information, let us know in box 20 (‘Remarks’).
C is the most common source.
Use C if the Article 10 certificates for the parent birds also show C.
If you’re unsure of the definition of captivity, check Article 54 of Chapter XIII of Regulation (EC) No 865/2006
If you’re unsure of the definition of captivity, check Article 54 of Chapter XIII of Regulation (EC) No 865/2006
Use U if you do not have evidence that the bird was captive bred.
You must clearly explain the following:
For example, a signed letter from the person who gifted you the bird, or a copy of a dated invoice from the seller.
Use O if your bird hatched before its species name was added to the CITES list (this is regardless of Annex or Appendix).
Use D if you are a CITES-registered breeder and the UK CITES management authority has confirmed your registration.
This includes birds taken from the wild (as eggs or young) that would not have survived to adulthood.
Use if customs or other law enforcement officers seized your bird.
You must give us the details and include any seizure reference numbers and letters from law enforcement officers.
Write the name of the country where your bird was taken from the wild, born and bred in captivity, or bred through artificial insemination.
If your bird came from outside the UK, write the export permit number for that country. Otherwise, write ‘N/A’.
If your bird has an export permit, write the issue date that’s on the export permit. Otherwise, write ‘N/A’.
If somebody imported the bird into a country within the European Union (EU) before 1 January 2021 (this includes the UK), write the name of that EU member state.
If somebody imported the bird into the UK after 1 January 2021, write ‘UNITED KINGDOM’.
Otherwise, write ‘N/A’.
If somebody imported your bird into the EU or UK, write the import certificate number. If not, write ‘N/A’.
You should include a copy of the customs stamped EU or UK import permit with your application. Tell us you are including it in box 20 (‘Remarks’).
If your bird has an import permit, write the issue date that’s on the import permit. Otherwise, write ‘N/A’.
Write the full, scientific name of your bird’s species, which will be in Latin. It is your responsibility to check the accuracy of this name, which you can do by:
We cannot accept common names and CITES cannot identify species.
If your bird is a hybrid, you must write the scientific names of the different species separated by an ‘X’. For example, Falco rusticolus X Falco cherrug.
Write the common name of your bird.
On Species Plus, the ‘Names’ tab will tell you the common English name of your bird. Use the first name if more than one name is shown.
If no common name is shown on Species Plus, write ‘Unknown’.
Tick the statement that best describes where your bird comes from. You can tick more than 1 box.
For some statements, you have to send us supporting information. You can enclose this with your application or send it by covering email or letter.  If you are including anything, tell us in box 20 (‘Remarks’).
a) tick if somebody removed your bird from the wild. You must include supporting evidence telling us when, where and why this happened.
b) tick if your bird escaped or somebody abandoned it. You must include supporting evidence telling us when, where and why this happened.
c) tick if your bird was captive bred. You must also tell us:
d) tick if somebody acquired or imported your bird into a country that was part of the European Union (EU) after 9 December 1996. You must provide supporting evidence.
e) tick if somebody acquired or imported your bird into a country that was part of the European Union (EU) before 1 June 1997. You must provide supporting evidence.
f) tick if somebody acquired or imported your bird into a country that was part of the European Union (EU) before 1 January 1984. You must provide supporting evidence.
g) tick if somebody acquired or imported your bird into a country that was part of the European Union (EU) before 3 December 1982. You must provide supporting evidence.
Tell us how you are going to use your Article 10 certificate by ticking box b), c) or d). You can ignore the other boxes.
b) tick if you want full commercial use of your bird. This includes:
c) tick if you only want to display your bird to the public. If you select option c), you cannot
d) tick if you want to use your bird for the following non-commercial purposes:
If applicable, provide supporting information about your breeding, research or education programme. If you select option d), you cannot:
The Article 10 certificate we send you may not reflect your selection above and it may contain special conditions.
Use this box to tell us about any supporting information or documents you are providing. If there is not enough space, you can include the information in an email or covering letter:
Enclosed with application:
Sign and date your application, and tell us where (place, town, city) in the UK you are. By signing, you are confirming that all the information you have provided is correct.
If you would like help completing your form, we can send you:
To request these, email wildlife.licensing@apha.gov.uk or phone 0117 372 3700.
It’s quickest to send your application by email to CITESapplication@apha.gov.uk
Send any scans of completed forms and supporting documents as email attachments. Do not paste them into the text of the email. Check that any scans are easy to read.
Write your email address on the signature line or in box 20 (‘Remarks’) on the application form.
You should include this line in your email: ‘I [your name] am the owner of the email account below and I am also the applicant.’
You can post your application to:
UK CITES Management Authority
Centre for International Trade
Horizon House
Deanery Road
Bristol
BS1 5AH

You can phone us on 0117 372 3700 to check that we’ve received your application. To help us find your application, we need to know the following:
We aim to process applications and issue certificates within 15 working days. This may go up to 30 working days during the bird breeding season.
Some applications may take longer if we need additional information or scientific advice.
If your application is urgent, let us know why in your email or covering letter.
We send Article 10 certificates by first-class post (Royal Mail).
If you would like your certificate to arrive the next day, there is a fee for special delivery. Phone us to request this on 0117 372 3700.
If you would like to collect your certificate from our Bristol office, tell us in box 20 (‘Remarks’). We will phone you when it is ready.
Our office address is UK CITES Management Authority, Centre for International Trade – Bristol, Horizon House, Deanery Road, Bristol BS1 5AH.
When you receive your certificate, check if all the details are correct.
If we have made an error, we can send you a corrected, replacement certificate. You must post the incorrect certificate back to us.
If you have made an error, we can send you a corrected, replacement certificate for a small fee of £1.50.
A lack of supporting information is the most common reason for an unsuccessful application or a restricted certificate. Be sure to include enough information about:
If your application is unsuccessful, you can keep your bird as a pet or gift it to somebody else, but you cannot use it for any commercial purpose, including:
If you would like to see a completed Article 10 form to help you fill in your own form, email us wildlife.licensing@apha.gov.uk
Where we ask you to provide supporting information and copies of other documents you can do this by:
Don’t include personal or financial information like your National Insurance number or credit card details.
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